How Do You Get A Urine Infection

Pregnant women know all too well that urine infections are one of the more painful and inconvenient side effects of pregnancy. But how exactly does one get a urine infection? Is there something you can do to avoid developing this condition? What are the risks if you do get it? And how will a urine infection manifest itself in the body? To answer these questions, we'll take an overview look at what urine is, why pregnant women might develop these infections, and how pregnancy complications may lead to their onset. By understanding the risk factors for getting a urinary tract infection during pregnancy, expectant mothers and partners can better prepare themselves for potential unpleasant surprises. Article Body: Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are among the most common and pesky side effects that a pregnant mother comes across. Women sometimes experience UTIs in childhood, but those symptoms are typically mild and short-lived. The main reason children develop UTIs is that their bladder and urethra develop rapidly during puberty. Once pregnancy begins, the uterus grows quickly, requiring a woman to poop more often. Still, the child will also release digestive enzymes into her system as part of her fetal development process at this time. As such, expectant mothers often notice increased pressure and gassiness in their lower abdomen. Additionally, a woman's organ systems undergo various pH changes during pregnancy and birth to a child. For example, as the woman begins to urinate more often, her kidneys become exposed to her waste products that are byproducts of her baby's development in her body at this time. The presence of enzymes and other digestive proteins can make it harder for the kidneys to produce an alkaline environment when they are usually more acidic. When the kidney has trouble maintaining an alkaline environment, this can cause decreased function and lead to kidney infection. Because of these factors, a woman's risk of developing UTIs increases during pregnancy. This is why many doctors also recommend that expectant mothers take extra precautions to address their risk of UTIs. The best way to prevent UTIs is by taking some simple steps. Drink plenty of fluids, including water or non-caffeine based sodas, with the caffeine removed. Specifically, pregnant women should avoid potentially dehydrating caffeine beverages such as teas and other carbonated drinks that contain caffeine. Additionally, some doctors recommend that expectant mothers take supplements like cranberry juice to aid in preventing UTIs. These juices contain certain acids that prevent bacteria from sticking to the bladder's walls or getting into the urinary tract. In particular, cranberry juice contains an acid called acetic acid that is widely known for its infection-fighting properties. All in all, many doctors and patients have found this to be a helpful remedy for UTIs and bladder infections. Article Summary: 1) is one of the more painful and inconvenient side effects of pregnancy. A pregnant woman's risk for developing UTIs increases as her body undergoes various physical changes during pregnancy. However, doctors suggest that pregnant women take simple steps to avoid developing UTIs. 2) Drink plenty of fluids, including water or non-caffeine based sodas, with the caffeine removed. Additionally, some doctors recommend that expectant mothers take supplements like cranberry juice to aid with the prevention of urinary tract infections during pregnancy 3) cranberry juice contains an acid called acetic acid that is widely known for its infection-fighting properties. All in all, many doctors and patients have found this to be a valuable remedy for UTIs and bladder infections Article Title: children with high blood pressure A regular blood pressure reading should always fall within specific parameters. For adults, blood pressure tends to be higher when relaxing but then decreases once they exert energy. This is especially true if someone is working out or doing more strenuous tasks. For children, the same rules apply, but paediatricians use different readings to diagnose and medicate kids with high blood pressure. Blood pressure readings in children tend to be much lower than adults' readings. This is because kids are still developing physically. Still, then again, it's also a good thing for doctors to keep an eye on their pressures as children need their blood pressure to circulate properly for their organs to function correctly. Children with high blood pressure may experience chronic headaches. The higher the blood pressure readings are, the greater the risk of suffering from seizures and even stroke. Blood Pressure Levels in Children This table provides a basic breakdown of healthy blood pressure readings for both children and adults: The two most common ways that doctors analyze a child's blood pressure is either through an oscillometric device or one of those old fashioned devices where you put your arm on a cuff with a bell attached to it. Doctors recommend that parents take their child to the doctor for regular checkups where their pressures will be readily available for analysis. On average, doctors tend to see patients every six months for about 12 assessments throughout childhood. If your reading is in the normal range, there's no reason to panic. However, if your tasks are consistently high or often climb above the upper limits of normal, it might be a good idea to seek professional medical attention.